When Heaven and Nature Sing

Join me!  When Heaven and Nature Sing, a show of thirty-six paintings from One-Hundred Flowers is showing at Palette Contemporary Art and Craft in Albuquerque, New Mexico this December.

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“Sun Pop” is one of thirty-six paintings in “When Heaven and Nature Sing” at Palette in Albuquerque this month.

 

While not much of a churchgoer, I do attend a service at my neighborhood church on Christmas Eve to sing the old songs by candlelight.  Joy to the World, is a regular on the roster.  The refrain, “and heaven and nature sing,” always gets me wondering . . . What is the relationship between heaven and nature in the song?  Can you explain it using color?

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“Saber,” “Rethinking the Fossil Record,” ” Kewpie,” and “Juicy,” each is encaustic and ink on panel, 5″ x 4″

 

One Hundred Flowers is a series of paintings based on botanical subjects where I aim to balance abandon with order by putting loose, gesture drawings of organic, botanical forms through a series of refining steps.

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“Kewpie,” encaustic and ink on panel, 5″ x 4″

 

Within each individual piece, I tend to go for analogous or tonal colors.  My goal is to arrive at a finished piece where the original subject is distilled to an essence, clarified, and transformed.

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“Bean,” encaustic, ink and gold leaf on panel, 5″ x 4″

 

But the series as a whole contains a mix of analogous and complementary hues. The thirty-six pieces below are available at Palette starting today through the end of the month.  Call or email gallery director Kurt Nelson for more information.

Superkitty

Barbie

Drink Me

Pickle

Animal

Orbit

Juicy

It's Hard To Say

Sweater

Simple Tree

Sun Pop

Utile

Mentor

Bean

In the Middle of

A Stream of Charged Particles

Mineral

Old Fashioned Rocketry

Saber

The Conformist

Fluffy

Trans

Penny

Droplet

Good Morning

A Good Sign

Lick

Rabbit

Kewpie

The Way We Stand

Grain

Spitting Image

White Flag of Courage

Seaside Alley

Clean Clean

Soothsayer

The Role of Art in Rebellion

I know it seems dark, but I’ve taken to reading Chris Hedges in the last year.  Hedges is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and activist.  His views about the future are apocalyptic.  I like him because he writes about things that interest me – the environment, the absence of the sacred in modern life, and women’s rights – in a sober voice that doesn’t sugar-coat.  Why are people so angry?  His take, as I see it, is that there’s a spiritual crisis at the heart of American discontent.  The old Horatio-Alger-type stories people have told about the U.S. for generations no longer ring true, and a coherent, new story about who we are has yet to form.  This idea excites me because it acknowledges spirit.  And because it points to art and culture as a possible way forward.  If you’re just getting started with Hedges I recommend Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt illustrated by Joe Sacco.  Here is a preview.

 

 

Here’s a short bite from Hedges on the role of art in rebellion.

 

There is a ton of Chris Hedges stuff on YouTube and he has a regular column at TruthDig.  If you’re like me (left-leaning with an interest in storytelling) some of it will inspire you.  Alas, some of it will probably also drive you nuts.  I take it in because his words sound real to me in an era when a lot of communication feels manipulative or superficial.

 

 “We are going to need those transcendent disciplines that remind us of who we are, why we are struggling, and what life is ultimately about.”

– Chris Hedges

 

How about you?  What have you read or watched in the last week that made sense to you?

Shangri-La

The way I feel about my work changes over time.  For example, this piece, Shangri-La, made me uncomfortable when I made it.  But I kept it anyway and today I am into it.

shangri-la

“Shangri-La,” encaustic and ink on panel, 5″ x 4″

Shangri-La is the mythical land depicted by James Hilton in his novel, Lost Horizon.  Here’s a clip from the film adaptation (which I like very much) that gets at the essence of the place:

 

I am on pins and needles with the election happening this week.

 

 I foresaw a time when man exalting in the technique of murder, would rage so hotly over the world, that every book, every treasure would be doomed to destruction. This vision was so vivid and so moving that I determined to gather together all things of beauty and culture that I could and preserve them here against the doom toward which the world is rushing.

― James Hilton, Lost Horizon

Student Work

Here are three pieces of student work in encaustic made at my studio in Boulder, Colorado by three different artists.  I’m excited to share them with you because of the range in sensibility they show.  When I teach encaustic it is my goal to help artists new to the medium find their own personal way into it.  Interested?  My next workshop, Basic Encaustic, is slated for Saturday, November 19th.

student1 Private Lesson:  This artist came to the studio with a strong sense of subject and composition inspired by her work in encaustic with another instructor.  We worked together to fill the technical gaps in her encaustic education and she left the studio with the beginnings of a new series based on botanical imagery that showcased her intuitive, fluent paint handing.

student2 Encaustic Transfer:  The two things that stand out to me when I look at this aritst’s work are the understated palette – look how the red works almost as a neutral here – and the atmospheric approach to mark-making.  The red and black marks on this piece that appear to have been drawn on to the panel were made using encaustic transfer techniques.

student3 Continuing Encaustic:  Simple stencils using painters’ tape were the focus of this session of Continuing Encaustic.  I like how this artist’s firm yet organic paint handling comes through in this simple and pleasing hot/cool composition.

I add workshops to my schedule by request as my schedule allows so if there’s something you are interested in that you’re not seeing on the schedule, let me know and I will see what I can do.  Private lessons available by request.

Deep Dark Secret

Today:  pulling together images with postcard-potential for my upcoming show, When Heaven and Nature Sing opening on December 2nd at Palette Contemporary in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  This piece is called Deep Dark Secret.

 

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Deep Dark Secret, encaustic and ink on panel, 5″ x 4″

 

Artists Living with Art

Artists Living with Art by Stacey Georgen and Amanda Benchley is one of those books you just enjoy having around.  (I am bummed about having to return they copy I’m reading to the library and may just have to spluge on one of my own.)  A picture book for adults, it presents photographs of art in artists’ homes alongside stories about their collections.

 

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Cover image, Artists Living with Art

 

Like the illustrated books I remember from my childhood with detailed interior scenes,  this is one you can pick up and browse and re-browse and continually discover something new.

 

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A two-page glimpse of photographer Cindy Sherman’s living room in Artists Living with Art.

 

Featured artists are: Tauba Auerbach, Francesco Clemente, Chuck Close, Will Cotton, John Currin/Rachel Feinstein, E.V. Day, Carroll Dunham/Laurie Simmons, Eric Fischl/April Gornick, Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Mary Heilmann, Rashid Johnson, Joan Jonas, Glenn Ligon, Helen Marden/Brice Marden, Marilyn Minter, Michele Oka Doner, Roxy Paine, Ellen Phelan/Joel Shapiro, Ugo Rondinone, Andres Serrano, Cindy Sherman, Pat Steir, Mickalene Thomas, Leo Villareal and Ursula Von Rydingsvard.

 

Photographed by Oberto Gili whose work has appeared in popular home design and fashion magazines like Architectural Digest and Vogue, each piece has the look and feel of an art-themed magazine spread.  Bound together the essays have a diversity and a creative field that is exciting to engage with.

 

 

Tomato vines

I was going to review an art book for you today, Artists Living with Art by Stacey Goergen and Amanda Benchley, but the fall garden has me under its spell.  So here’s a picture of some waning tomato vines instead.  It’s super-windy right now and the sky has that weird, intense yellow-green color that we sometimes get before a storm.  It’s about to turn cold, I hear.  Are you ready for the change?  I am.  Almost.

tomatoes

Tomatoes in the garden, October 2016

 

September

September is the month my husband and I pull honey, extract it, bottle it, and bring it to market, so I always feel a little extra busy this time of year.  Beekeeping feeds my appetite for tidy/tangled botanical imagery.  In this case, it’s the impromptu grass brush he uses to brush straggler bees off combs that caught my eye.

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Honey in the comb, September 2016

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